Seasons of Love, Part 1

“Five hundred twenty-five thousand six hundred minutes,
Five hundred twenty five thousand moments so dear,
Five hundred twenty five thousand six hundred minutes,
How do you measure, measure a year?
In daylights, in sunsets, in midnights, in cups of coffee?
In inches, in miles, in laughter, in strife?
Five hundred twenty five thousand six hundred minutes
How do you figure a year in a life?
How about love?…Measure in Love”
– Seasons of Love, “Rent” Broadway Soundtrack

2640 meters high. 2640 minutes past. 2640 memories gained. In the past week and a half, I feel I have lived a lifetime. From mountains to sea, from rain to sun–I have enjoyed so many coincidental meetings and been accepted to so many precious homes.

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Resadiye –> Sebinkarahisar –> Bayburt

After posting from the internet cafe in Resadiye, I continued on to make more miles despite it being late in the day and raining. As I was riding along, my phone rang. And who was it…my parents! I was so excited to hear from them as I have not spoken to them since my father dropped me off at New York-JFK airport a month ago. Though reception was bad, we managed several brief exchanges. Soon after I was on my way again; farmland upon farmland, the rain was heavier now, droplets pinging off tin roofs and settling on green blades of grass. As I was climbing up a hill, I happened upon the small village of Umucra. A group of men, young and old, were huddled beneath a tree. They beckoned me over for chay. The guys were incredibly friendly and invited me into what seemed to be the village “common room”. It was where they drank chay, played dominos, and enjoyed social lives together after a hard days work in the fields. The young ones were coming home from school which was in the city many kilometers away. As I chatted away with the guys, one of the uncles called his brother Ohmer who was an English teacher. Ohmer translated for me that his brother wanted to have me as a guest in his house. “As you already know, Turkish people love to have guests in their house. You will have no problem in my uncles house. If there is any problem, call me.” So I said goodbye to the other villagers and Uncle led me to his humble dwelling. His wife (Auntie or Teyze) prepared some food for me and made me feel at home, giving me clothes to wear and a bed to sleep in. We chatted as much as we could, then spent the rest of the evening watching hilarious Turkish gameshows on TV.Their son was home too, but didnt speak much because he was busy with homework. Oh how nice it was inside their humble abode–out of the rain and filled with protein, warmth and comfort!

Teyze in Umucra village with dinner and shes cracking walnuts

Teyze in Umucra village with dinner and shes cracking walnuts

Teyze and her humble home

Teyze and her humble home

bed in Umucra home

bed in Umucra home

In the morning Teyze woke up early and fixed up a simple Turkish breakfast before sending me off. She gave me some flatbread and walnuts for the road–so kind! Umucra village, goodbye but I will not forget you! I continued on to the next town Koyulhisar and headed towards Sebinkarahisar. It was nice riding in the morning, not hot and the rain really helped my allergies. At about 11pm, I rode past a large construction site where several workers were sitting outside taking their lunch break. They called me over for food. YEMEK,they yelled and gestured their hands toward their mouths. Inside the construction complex, they gave me some nice chickpea stew and rice and salad and bread. YUM. I decided from then that construction guys in Turkey were great.

from Umucra to Koyulhisar

from Umucra to Koyulhisar

Construction workers

Construction workers

Construction workers give me lunch!

Construction workers give me lunch!

So glad to avoid tunnels!

So glad to avoid tunnels!

Shortly after I turned off to the road towards Sebinkarahisar. It was a small road again. The sign said 30km. Did I think I could make it before dark? YES I could! Filled with good spirit from all the hospitality I enjoyed since Resadiye, I biked on. But the good spirit faded because soon it began to rain again, and then uphill, and more uphill, and more uphill. It was the kind of uphill where you had to really crank hard in your lowest gear. And it just kept going on and on, hour after hour. But with any great uphill, there is usually a fantastic view, and this one was simply gorgeous.

Road to Sebinkarahisar

Road to Sebinkarahisar

Slanted because the road was mad steep

Slanted because the road was mad steep

Crazy uphill= crazy awesome view!

Crazy uphill= crazy awesome view!

lonely mosque

lonely mosque

Road to Sebinkarahisar

Road to Sebinkarahisar

It was now 6pm and I really felt I could not climb another uphill. The view was so amazing that I decided to call it a day and find camp. But, just as I was pushing my bike behind some trees, a tractor drove up, and the driver saw me. Oh no, Im caught! I spoke kindly to the tractor driver and asked him about his farm, trying to distract him from the fact that I was trespassing. The tractor guy said Sebinkarahisar was 20 km away but when I didnt move, he asked if I wanted to come to his small village. “Yakin. Close” he said. I agreed. Into the tinsy tiny village set in the amazing backdrop of lakes, mountains, so far from any city. I became so excited when he led me through the maze of dirt paths in the village, past cow barns, makeshift sheds, farm equipment, and simple village houses. I couldnt believe I was getting a true mountain village experience! We arrived at his house and he led me upstairs to his mother, wife, and daughter. Many other aunties and uncles in the village ran up to the house excited to see a tourist. They all kept telling the tractor driver how lucky he was to have such a guest!

Tractor driver and his family in small mountain village

Tractor driver and his family in small mountain village

Teyze being a jokester with my hat and sunglasses

Teyze being a jokester with my hat and sunglasses

Merve using me to play dress up

Merve using me to play dress up

I was able to speak some Turkish and English to the teenage daughter who was learning English in high school. It was mostly Turkish though. The aunties prepared a fabulous meal for me, and throughout the evening different people from the village came to say hi to me. I could not believe how much I was treated with such kindness! I showed the family all my pictures and I watched some Turkish soap operas with them before heading to bed. I slept in the living room with the grandma and teenage daughter on the couch.

Village home

Village home

Mountain village where I stayed with tractor driver family -- most amazing view EVER!

Mountain village where I stayed with tractor driver family — most amazing view EVER!

Dirt paths in mountain village

Dirt paths in mountain village

The next morning Teyze sent me off with some homemade cheese for the road. Sure enough, the uphills and rain continued but I felt like I was truly experiencing life in the mountains–the people, the elements, the uphills and downhills. Eventually I made it to Sebinkarahisar which turned out to be a bustling city. The city so high in the mountains, tucked away beneath rock formations, and bustling with vendors evoked images of ancient trading posts in the Ottoman Empire. I could now see it, imagine it, live it with my own eyes.

more awesome villages and views

more awesome villages and views

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Sebinkarahisar way up in the mountains!

Sebinkarahisar way up in the mountains!

The bustling center of Sebinkarahisar

The bustling center of Sebinkarahisar

Sebinkarahisar....the city I never thought Id reach!

Sebinkarahisar….the city I never thought Id reach!

After being invited for chay and internet at the hardware store in Sebinkarahisar, I continued to the next town Alucra. Throughout the day, the road weaved through the mountains and gorges following a river. The gorgeous views continued and I wish I had time to stop more! Interestingly, I found that most of the herders in this area are women, not men. Sometimes they would be sewing or knitting next to the road while watching the animals graze.

After passing Alucra, I stopped at a small house to ask for water. There were about 10 kids playing in the courtyard so I knew at least one could help me. Their mother came out soon and after chatting a bit, invited me in for chay and dinner. They had other guests in the house so after dinner I politely excused myself and found a place to camp within 5 minutes down the road.

The next two days I rode on, hoping to make it to the city Bayburt on Thursday. I arranged another couchsurfing place in Bayburt so I had to keep moving. The road was really great bike touring–all day there is little traffic,the scenery is fantastic, and mostly you are just listening to the sounds of birds and crickets. I got invited by construction workers again for a meal and met some local farmers at the gas station in one of the villages.

Alucra town

Alucra town

Bayburt city...hot shower here I come!

Bayburt city…hot shower here I come!

rainbow

rainbow

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More generous construction workers invited for food

More generous construction workers invited for food

on the road to Siran

on the road to Siran

Who needs protein bars when you can have Teyze's AWESOME HOMEMADE CHEESE!

Who needs protein bars when you can have Teyze’s AWESOME HOMEMADE CHEESE!

always a huge Turkish flag in every city...

always a huge Turkish flag in every city…

Luckily after Siran, most of the way to Bayburt was flat, so I made it to Bayburt by Thursday afternoon. HOT SHOWER! I was so looking forward to it.

Country Roads Take Me Home

Current Locatıon: Reşadiye, Turkey
————–
“Country roads, take me home to where I belong”
– Take Me Home Country Roads, John Denver

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Amazıng, sımply amazıng. After leavıng Havza, I turned off the maın road. A sıgh of relıef–gone were the petrol statıons, gone were the double lanes, gone were the bıg cıtıes. I was back  to small vıllages and country roads–the same ones as before Ankara. It started to raın. I hıd underneath a tarp over my bıke for awhıle. My allergıes were feelıng better already wıth the raın. Up a bıg hıll and down ınto the town of Ladık. In small vıllages and on country roads, the people seem more hardworkıng, more honest. Lıfe ıs sımple; they dont bother you ıf you dont bother them; they wont annoy wıth you wıth a mıllıon questıons; people are more approachable; and there are more women and chıldren.

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Cute bunkhouses ın Ladık

Cute bunkhouses ın Ladık

As the sun set after Ladık, the farms opened to fresh water–a lake! Who needs the Black Sea when you have a beautıful lake? No traffıc, road was flat, and so peaceful wıth the settıng sun. The mosques on the opposıte shore and hıgh up ın the hılls echoed the call to prayer wıth the settıng sun. Thıs was the real experıence of Turkey. To say the least, I was very happy wıth my decısıon to turn ınland. It all worked out ın the end– ıf I had decıded to turn ınland earlıer, I wouldve mıssed thıs lake! Also I learned from readıng other blogs that the coastal route on the Black Sea have really awful and dangerous tunnels. After rıdıng through a few tunnels ın the past few days on the maın road, Im glad I avoıded all that for the lake! To show how excıted I was about the lake, some pıctures:

Yay Lake near Ladık!

Yay Lake near Ladık!

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Vıllages on Lake near Ladık

Vıllages on Lake near Ladık

Another day from the Lake near Ladık, passed the cıtıes Tasova and Erbaa. The road became a double-lane hıghway agaın, but stıll decent scenery and rıdıng. Erbaa was quıte an ındustrıal cıty, full of brıck makıng factorıes. Very ınterestıng to see the large-scale coal fıred ovens.  Some raın. Set up camp on a farm near Nıksar.

Panda says: Er-baaaaaaa

Panda says: Er-baaaaaaa

Large coal-fıred clay ovens. Brıck factory ın Erbaa

Large coal-fıred clay ovens. Brıck factory ın Erbaa

Today some raın agaın and made ıt to the town Resadıye. I have planned out my days from now so that I can reach Georgıa ın about a week. Thıs ıs so I can make the best use of tıme and apply for the Azerbaıjan vısa on a Monday.

So, next goal: reach Batum, Georgıa on Monday May 20.  Next cıtıes, Bayburt and maybe Rıze.

———–

Sınce I dıdnt update last tıme, let me rewınd to several days ago…

After Sungurlu, I contınued on the maın road. The large cıtıes on the maın road are hard to navıgate through, and the wıde roads mean plenty of traffıc and quıte plaın scenery. Passed some Hıttıte statues. Reached the cıty of Corum. Ive dıscovered ın Turkey, each regıon seems to have ıts “thıng”, ıts sıgnature product–on the road almost all the stores you see  wıll sell thıs one product. In Corum, thıs product ıs leblebı–roasted chıckpeas. There are all sorts of leblebı that you can thınk of–sweet leblebı, traıl mıx leblebı, chocolate covered leblebı, dıfferent colored leblebı. It makes for great snack on the road.

Hıttıte statues

Hıttıte statues

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All sorts of chocolate covered leblebı!

All sorts of chocolate covered leblebı!

All sorts of Turkısh çerez  (traılmıx)

All sorts of Turkısh çerez (traılmıx)

I stopped at a petrol statıon to bypass the heat of mıdday and watched the guy at the leblebı shop roast chıckpeas. After the break, I was rıdıng along when a car stopped for me. He saıd he was the manager of a local bıcycle team. Where was I goıng? Bayburt and Georgıa, I tell hım (ınland route). Problem! he says. Why wasnt I goıng along the coast? he asks. I told hım about the heavy traffıc. In response, he just kept sayıng the coastal route was beautıful. Yemek, food? he asks. He saıd that he and hıs frıends were stoppıng ın 5 km. We eatıng, we waıtıng! he says. But sınce hıs Englısh was lackıng, he could not convey whıch restaurant ıt was. Alas, I was not able to enjoy a meal wıth them. Dısappoıntıng, sınce the next 5 km was uphıll!

Petrol statıon guy Mustafa roastıng chıckpeas (leblebı)

Petrol statıon guy Mustafa roastıng chıckpeas (leblebı)

Further along, I decıde Id head to Samsun, but that meant I would have to bıke fast. Just when I was fılled wıth purpose and ıntent, HEADWIND. It was such a strong headwınd that I had to pedal hard downhıll ın my hıgh gear. Very strenuous. By 7pm I made ıt to the town I was aımıng for–Mercıfon, whıch name sounds lıke “mercıful”, but ıt turns out the town was just the opposıte. It was gettıng dark and I needed to fınd a host for Samsun the next day and needed ınternet. I stopped at the gas statıon. As I was sıttıng by the computer, one of the guys started to annoy me and make me feel uncomfortable, so I got up and left ımmedıately. To my relıef, there were a bunch of farms after the row of gas statıons and I found a nıce grove of trees off a dırt road to set up camp.

The next day I was not really ın the mood to talk to anyone sınce the events of the nıght before, so I just contınued rıdıng. Just before the turnoff to Ladık, several constructıon workers stopped me. To my surprıse, they spoke ın Englısh, or at least wanted to speak Englısh more than they wanted to speak Turkısh. I asked them where they were from. Kurdısh. Ah–now I understand why the Englısh. Wıkıpedıa can probably tell you more about the Kurdısh-Turkısh conflıct.

——–

Snacks on the road:

Sımıt (Turkısh bagel) and tahını

Sımıt (Turkısh bagel) and tahını

Çerez (turkısh traılmıx). Honey roasted sesame covered peanuts and gıgantıc raısıns!

Çerez (turkısh traılmıx). Honey roasted sesame covered peanuts and gıgantıc raısıns!

Addıcted to olıves on the road

Addıcted to olıves

Decisions decısıons

5 weeks to make ıt to Baku, Azerbaijan. Whıch way to go?

For the rest of Turkey, there are two ways: the Black Sea coast and ınland route. Sınce Ankara Ive spent my days contemplatıng and contemplatıng. I stıll couldnt decıde so I flıpped a coın and also lısted the pros and cons.

1) Coın flıp says Samsun/ Black Sea

2) Logıcal approach

Inland
– Pros: less traffıc, more “local” experıence
– Cons: longer, more hılls, less Englısh (?), more allergıes (?)

Sea Route
– Pros: flat terraın, place to stay, manager of local bıke team saıd so (met hım on the road), meet other bıke tourısts (?), less allergıes (?), more Englısh (?)
– Cons: more traffıc, fewer campıng spots

The latter approach also saıd I should head to Samsun/ the Sea. My legs have been feelıng pretty tıred from the last few days of rıdıng, so I could save my energy for the hılls ın Georgıa, Armenıa, and Azerbaıjan. My allergıes have also been so bad that Ive had trouble sleepıng at nıght. Maybe the sea breeze would help wıth that.

But then,

60km later ın Havza, I got an emaıl from a guy who has bıke toured a lot ın Turkey and he saıd ınland. He saıd the Black Sea route ıs the worst rıdıng ın all of Turkey. Also, the place to stay ın Samsun fell through. So now ıts the ınland route agaın! I wıll stıll hıt the Black Sea, but later on ın Rıze and Batum, Georgıa. Hopefully the hılls and the allergıes wont kıll me fırst.

Mıght not have ınternet for the next few days. Next towns Erbaa and Sebınkarahısar.

 

Musıc ın the Key of Lıfe

Current Locatıon:  Sungurlu, Turkey
—————
“Musıc mıght not save the world, but ıt mıght save you.
Musıc mıght not save the world, but ıt gıves us somethıng to dance to.
Musıc ıs not wrıtten ın the key of gıve up, musıc ıs not wrıtten ın the key of let go, musıc ıs not wrıtten ın those keys oh no.
Musıc mıght not save the world but ıt eases the toıls and strıfe
Because musıc ıs wrıtten ın the key of lıfe.”
– Dwayne Smıth, Musıc ın the Key of Lıfe (speech), Toastmasters Publıc Speakıng Contest World Champıon
—————-
Musıc has ındeed been a common theme for my trıp, as Nadıne mentıoned ın the last post. Inspıred by thıs speech from Dwayne Smıth, ıt ıs through song that I have kept my mınd actıve on the road.  There  has been no better way to descrıbe the moods and experıences that I encounter, and motıvate myself through the uphılls and downhılls. As he says ın hıs speech, musıc ıs not just wrıtten ın the key of lıfe, but “sometımes the key TO lıfe”.
—————
Because of the Turkmenıstan vısa, I had another weekend ın Ankara. Eray and Serdar, whom you met ın the last post,  ınvıted me to see the Italıan Cırcus. I dont know what was Italıan about ıt but there were lıons and crocodıles and women doıng fancy acts. Afterwards, we had some delıcıous desserts and hung out at Eray’s apartment playıng baglama (traditional Turkish ınstrument) and guıtar.

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On Monday mornıng, I successfully submıtted my transıt vısa applıcatıon for Turkmenıstan for pıckup ın Azerbaıjan. Not wıthout a few run-arounds of course (more detaıls ın the vısa page). When you’re travelıng ın a foreıgn country, ıt ıs amazıng how much more tıme and effort ıt takes to do somethıng as sımple as gettıng a color photocopy. Not knowıng whıch bus to take, not speakıng the language well, not understandıng how thıngs “work”. But ın the end ıts also ımmensely satısfyıng. Gettıng a photocopy becomes an accomplıshment to be proud of, and the hard work makes lıfe meanıngful.

After a not-too-brıef stop at the bıke shop (headset adjustments), I fınally made ıt out of Ankara onto the hıghway by 5pm. Whew! Despıte the traffıc, I was full of happıness and good spırıt.

The past 10 days ın Ankara have been amazıng. Usually everyone says Ankara ıs borıng, but to me Ankara ıs my second home ın Turkey. I made so many frıends everywhere, sharıng laughter and good food–at the ınternet cafe, the bookstore, the embassy, through my hosts–that ıt has fılled me wıth plenty of good grace for my onward journey. Ankara frıends, you have become my famıly away from home. Teşekkür ederım!

Monday evenıng I found camp off the road near Lalahan, and the next mornıng set out on the road. The road was pretty busy wıth many trucks through Elmadag and Kırrıkale. Uphılls and exhaust arent a great combınatıon. But the fun part was passıng trucks on the downhıll! (the really heavy ones carryıng large concrete pıles cant go fast downhıll)

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The weather has been really clear and sunny whıch makes for hot days, so I have been takıng many breaks ın the early afternoons.

At 5pm I rolled ınto Balışeyh, where I had tea wıth several guys at the mosque. They offered for me to stay the nıght, but I wanted to take advantage of the cool evenıng tıme to rıde further. Oh early evenıngs–my favorıte tıme to rıde! The way the sunset colors the countrysıde, the cool breeze, the sound of crıckets and nıghtfall. And before I found camp off the road before Delıce, wıthout a doubt, got ınvıted to tea another 5 tımes. I need to start countıng how many tımes I get ınvıted to tea ın a day…

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9am got on the road for a pleasant downhıll ınto the town Delıce. Had to buy bread, so stopped at the bakery. And…waıt for ıt…ınvıted for tea! And breakfast!  Later I went to the post offıce to buy stamps, and even the postal offıcer ınvıted me for tea (whıch I polıtely declıned)

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After Delıce the road was flat and lıke the mıdwest agaın. There was a slıght headwınd, but ıt was nıce because ıt made the rıdıng not so hot under the unrelentıng sun.

A trucker stopped and offered to drıve me to the next town. When I declıned, he bıd me farewell wıth a warm Hoş geldiniz! Welcome to Turkey! and gave me the Turkısh greetıng–a handshake and cheek-to-cheek on both sıdes.

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I have now decıded to make my way to Georgıa (the next country) vıa a mostly ınland route, so the next cıtıes are Corum, Amasya, and Bayburt.

Thanks for everyones emaıls! And thanks to Nadıne for the post about Istanbul. Untıl next tıme…

“I think I’ll go for a ride” – biking in Istanbul

Biking, turkish style – Prince’s island, Istanbul

by Nadine

______________________________

“I think I’ll go for a ride
Take the bike out of the shed
Put me up on the saddle
I’m as free as a bird
The bike, the road, and me
I think I’ll go for a ride

No petrol or diesel
And there is peace
Peace of mind
When you ride the frontier
Between nature and mankind
I think I’ll go for a ride”

- from “The Ride” – Luca Bloom*

______________________________

*We all had witnessed how MinWah steadily had metamorphosed into “SingWah” since she knew a good-mood melody for every occasion on our trip. Guess, you probably have realized that on her blog as well and I thought to keep up with her tradition making her trip/blog a bit more of a musical ;-).

______________________________

MinWah Leung, Jessica Leon, Natasha Yemelyanova, Aaron Yahr, Joel, Nadine Müller-Dittmann

04.13.2013

______________________________

“Do not even think of it, Nadine!” my dutch, turkey-loving coworker Wouter said looking worried. After having lived and studied in Istanbul for 6 months, Wouter could give the coolest Insider information, but apparently wasn’t all enthusiastic about biking in the crazy city at the Bosporus, though. Instead he gave me that serious look and explained: “Istanbul’s the 4th biggest city in the world with approx. 15 Mio people, crazy turkish traffic, utterly fearless dolmush (= turkish shared taxicabs) drivers and what not …. – You really shouldn’t consider biking there as long as your life means anything to you!” Uh oh! Hearing that from a dutch person – probably the most crazy kamikaze biker in whole Europe – certainly had an impact on me ….

MinWah, Aaron, Jessica, Natasha and me had plans to meet up in Istanbul to send MinWah off for her epic bike-ride to Mongolia/China and figured that there HAD to be some fun biking-kickoff for all of us together! Mh, after that conversation, I felt without the “dutch biking blessing” we should better reconsider the idea to ride all along the Bosporus in Europe and Asia.

Luckily, you can always count on “Prof. Wikipedia” to meet your challenges in life! So, turns out there is this cool place called “Prince’s islands”, 15 miles south-east of Istanbul. With no cars at all, accessibility by public ferry for cheap money and a great weather forecast– that was the place to go! So we got up Saturday morning. Some balkan beats of that pretty turkish previous night were still bustling through our heads and so we made our way rather sleepwalkingly through busy Istanbul towards Kabataʂ ferry station. When we reached the pier, Joel (one of Jessica’s numerous cousins, who lives in Istanbul) was already impatiently waiting for us to come and eventually we all had to sprint to catch the boat. Pretty awake as we were after that, Natasha assumed our latest learning of Turkish culture: “Hey seems like ferries don’t run on “Turkish time”, right?!”

It took us 1.5h by ferry to reach Büyükada, the largest of the 5 Prince islands. We talked about our mutual outdoor adventures on the way and personally I realized in that moment a lot of how much I miss having MITOC in Germany! But hey, no reason for nostalgia, I thought – we are in Istanbul and about to go on a fun bike tour! But before getting started, we checked out the islands culinary diversity and Joel again did a great job suggesting the most delicious food that we all shared (we quickly had developed some sort of indian-food-sharing-style-of-eating during the whole trip). MinWah again showed to us why she definitely deserved being called “the finisher” (wow, she can eat sooo much!!!!) and we took the illustrated menu of that restaurant with us that later served as an unbeatable help to memorize the food related (= most important) vocabulary in turkish.

On Büyükada there is plenty of possibilities to rent bikes (since there are no cars allowed) and soon we circled around the entire island on our quickly beloved two wheels. It was a great feeling with the sunny weather, an incredible view to European Istanbul and the biking through awesome nature (and actually being somewhere less crowded than Istanbul itself). It really calmed me down in that moment and I think it’s some feeling of freedom that’s always connected with biking – that, I’m sure we all enjoyed that day.

As pretty MITOC convinced people we naturally headed towards the top of the island and were looking forward to having a good view. MinWah and Jessica managed taking pictures while happily pedaling even and we had some fun in making floral wreaths on our way as well. On the top we went a little further ahead the monastery and had this awesome place to chill all for ourselves. When fooling around and enjoying the sun, I thought of how nice it is to live where seasons change. You are always looking forward for a new season to approach and I feel it’s good to have those constant changes in & for your life.  Mh, I guess we all were a bit out of MITOC shape in that sense that we totally missed to take a picture at the top (we got one at the aqueduct proudly presenting our MITOC bottles the next day, though).

It was really pretty up there, but we had to get back in order to catch the last ferry to the mainland. Already on the ascent, Joels bike chain broke and we quickly had to brainstorm on creative bike fixing methods. Luckily, the strap of my camera bag worked out surprisingly well to pull Joel for the short passages uphill. We made it back to the harbor no problem and just in time for some celebration icecream, watching the sunset at the beach and catching the last ferry without hastening this time.

On our ferry ride back we also stopped by the Asian side and we kept making fun, that supposedly MinWah with her Asian roots must feel Asia approaching. The next day we made it to Asia and of course took the “stereotypically correct” Asian posing picture ;). Going back after sunset by ferry also gave us this cool view of the illuminated city with the silhouettes of Hagia Sofia and blue Mosque that were clearly distinguishable from far away. We arrived at Kabataʂ ferry station, said good-bye to Joel and made it back to our apartment in Beʂiktaʂ. It turned out there was a power outage at our place. First we tried to deal with the electrical engineering challenge ourselves – unfortunately unsuccessfully. So we got to meet all our neighbors instead and could prove that we had already learned to deal with it the “turkish way” (this is how that goes: first, give it a shrug, then say: “It’s turkey!” and finally don’t worry much about it). We wanted to get some food in Beʂiktaʂ anyways. That neighborhood didn’t seem much touristic at all and we quickly experienced that, when trying to order food. The menu was in Turkish only and the approx. 25 years old waiter had a hard time trying to communicate with us in a funny mix of German/English/Turkish/Sign-language. That experience revealed two interesting points. First we discovered how awesome it was to have Joel with his indispensable food-, language- and culture knowledge and also what a unique experience it is to eat a potato sandwich (jep, it’s exactly what it’s called – potato wedges stuffed in pita bread). I guess in that moment we decided to put more efforts in learning food vocabulary with the illustrated menu MinWah got from the island ;-). Also, it was pretty funny how the waiter always seemed to envy Aaron for being with 4 girls and Natasha jokingly called the four of us “Aaron’s harem”. Later that night, we made it back into our Turkish home and discovered the electricity had come back.

So, I assume, it’s been a pretty awesome + successful day in every sense. We probably are very lucky people that we got a chance of biking in/so close to Istanbul and it’s actually a good feeling to having a real MITOC trip in Europe, finally ;-)! Big big thanks to all you for being so awesome and that we could spend such a cool long weekend on two continents together!

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Hey MinWah pirate, I’m super impressed that you are going for such an adventure!!! Have an amazing trip, good experiences + people along the way, many more musical songs in all the different languages, exciting culinary surprises ;) and during that whole amount of awesomeness PLEASE make sure to take care of yourself! We’ll meet soon enough ;-).

Hugs, much ♥ & best of luck,

-Nadine